March 8, 2017

Vuitton's experimental folk

An incredible stage: the Cour Marly in the heart of the Louvre. A labyrinth of stairs filled with space age chairs and important sculptures. Originally commissioned for the garden at Marley Castle - Louis XIV's villa residence - they now live under the futurist cupola designed by Leoh Ming Pei and Michel Macary.

di Giampietro Baudo (Parigi)

Vuitton's experimental folk

Fall/winter 2017/18 rituals - signed Nicolas Ghesquière for the house of Louis Vuitton - move in between fascinating pieces of art while the daylight slowing ebbs away to night. Because the show, one day earlier than the traditional schedule, closed a month of shows that started in New York in September, with a multi-cultural ode to travel. A stream of looks with a folkloric feel and ideas of experimental conceptualism, staying faithful to the well-travelled heritage of the brand that was founded in 1854. Ghesquière completed his voyage looking at souvenirs. Traditional Slavic accents. Hints of sportswear made in the USA. Studs straight out of the Wild West. The fur coats of Inuit tribes. Native American prints. Wardrobe staples appear too. Where masculinity can be seen in androgynous silhouettes. Where the chic Parisian is woven into the tweed. Where streetwear mixes with denim. Where that intriguing French wickedness is explored through hard leather. But the conceptual crash is elevated with the eveningwear. In a dress of primitive layers, dark styles punctuated with light, brocade, tapestry florals, and sci-fi plastic accents. Slips and dresses, even when they flirt with tartan or are covered in sequins. Scoring points this season, two opposites: chunky outdoor boots with important soles, and experimental bags with robotic accents. Without counting the fetish style chains: cascades of colored metal that swing from wrists, decorate tops and embellish necks like scarves.